Waikato Gundog Club

Waikato Gundog Club was established in 1976 and is affiliated with the New Zealand Gundog Trials Association and the New Zealand Kennel Club.

German Shorthaired Pointer

The German Shorthaired Pointer (GSP) is a breed of dog developed in the 1800s in Germany for hunting.  The breed is streamlined yet powerful with strong hindquarters that make it able to move rapidly and turn quickly. It has moderately long flop ears set high on the head. Its muzzle is long, broad, and strong, allowing it to retrieve even heavy game. The dog's profile should be straight or strongly Roman nosed; any dished appearance to the profile is incorrect. The eyes are generally brown, with darker eyes being desirable; yellow or "bird of prey" eyes are a fault. The tail is commonly docked, although this is now prohibited in some countries. The correct location for docking for GSP is after the caudal vertebrae start to curl, leaving enough tail to let the dog communicate through tail wagging and movement. The docked tail should not be too long or too short but should balance the appearance of the head and body. The GSP tail is carried at a jaunty angle, not curled under. When the GSP is in classic point stance, the tail should be held straight out from the body forming a line with the pointing head and body. Like all German pointers, GSP have webbed feet.

German Wirehaired Pointer

The most popular breed of hunting dog in Germany where it is known simply as a Drahthaar or wirehair.

Developed as an all round hunting dog complete with a weather proof coat the wirehair is at home as a bird and large game dog with a natural love of water suitable for all types retriever work.

The breed was created at the turn of last century from four parent breeds, one being the GSP, and it has been in NZ for around thirty years. The first GWP was imported by the late Jack Dawson from Marton, however, the gene pool has recently increased and with the breed gaining a large following, GWPs are now being trialed, Natural Ability tested and hunted regularly in the field all over the country.

GWP's are naturally aloof and very protective of their family and property, with a very serious manner for work, although they are happy to switch off in the house. Like all gundogs they require regular exercise. 

  

Hungarian Vizsla

The Vizsla (pronounced VEESH-la) is a dog breed originating in Hungary. The Hungarian or Magyar Vizsla represents one of the best in sporting dogs and loyal companions and has a strong claim to being one of the smallest of the all-round pointer-retriever breeds. The Vizsla's size is one of the breed's most attractive characteristics and through the centuries he has held a unique position for a sporting dog – that of household companion and family dog.

The Vizsla is a natural hunter endowed with a good nose and an above average trainability. Although they are lively, gentle mannered, demonstrably affectionate and sensitive, they are also fearless and possessed of a well-developed protective instinct.

Cesky Fousek
The Cesky Fousek is a Czech breed of versatile gun dog. The name fousek translates roughly from Czech as 'beardy" and refers to their prominent beard.  The Cesky Fousek is an ancient breed, although written standards were first established in the nineteenth century.   The Cesky Fousek has only been in New Zealand since 2003, and the population numbers about 25.  See newzealand.ceskyfousek.org

 

Weimaraner

The Weimaraner is a dog that was originally bred for hunting in the early 19th century. Early Weimaraners were used by royalty for hunting large game, such as boar, bears, deer, and foxes. As the popularity of large game hunting began to decline, Weimaraners were used for hunting smaller animals, like fowl, rabbits, and foxes. Rather than having a specific purpose such as pointing or flushing, the Weimaraner is an all purpose gun dog. The Weimaraner is loyal and loving to his family, an incredible hunter, and a fearless guardian of his family and territory. The name comes from the Grand Duke of Weimar, Karl August, whose court enjoyed hunting.

Brittany

The Brittany is a breed of gun dog primarily bred for bird hunting. Although the Brittany is often referred to as a spaniel, the breed's working characteristics are more akin to a pointer or setter. Brittanies were developed in the Brittany province of France in the 1800s.

English Pointer

The Pointer, often called the English Pointer, is a breed of dog developed as a gun dog. It is one of several pointing breeds.

English Setter

The English Setter is a breed of dog. It is part of the Setter family, which includes red Irish Setters, Irish Red and White Setters, and black-and-tan Gordon Setters.

The English Setter is a gun dog, bred for a mix of endurance and athleticism.

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Gordon Setter

A Gordon Setter is a large breed of dog, a member of the setter family that also includes both the better-known Irish Setter and the English Setter. Setter breeds are classified as members of either the Sporting or Gundog Group depending on the national kennel club or council. The original purpose of the breed was to hunt gamebirds. Their quarry in the United Kingdom, may be partridge or grouse, pheasant, ptarmigan, blackgame, snipe or woodcock: whilst overseas bird dogs are worked on quail, willow grouse, sand grouse, guinea fowl, sage hen, francolin and any other bird that will sit to a dog - that is to say, will attempt to avoid a potential predator by concealment rather than by taking to the wing at the first sign of danger. It is this combination of a bird that will sit fast in front of a dog that will remain on. 

Irish Setter

The Irish Setter (Irish: Madra rua, meaning "red dog"), also known as the Red Setter, is a breed of gundog and family dog. The term Irish Setter is commonly used to encompass the Show-bred dog recognized by the AKC as well as the field-bred Red Setter recognized by the Field Dog Stud Book. It is in the Setter Family.

Labrador Retriever

The Labrador Retriever (also Labrador, Labby, or Lab for short) is one of several kinds of retriever, a type of gun dog. The Labrador, once known as the Lesser Newfoundland, is the most popular breed of dog (by registered ownership) in the world, and is by a large margin the most popular breed by registration in the United States (since 1991), and the United Kingdom. It is also the most popular breed of assistance dog in the United States, Australia, and many other countries, as well as being widely used by police and other official bodies for their detection and working abilities. They are exceptionally affable, gentle, intelligent, energetic and good natured, and Labradors are generally considered good companions for people of all ages (including a high level of patience and tolerance for children), making them both excellent companions and working dogs. With training, the Labrador is one of the most dependable, obedient and multi-talented breeds in the world.

Flatcoat Retriever

The Flat-Coated Retriever is a gundog breed from the United Kingdom. It was developed as a retriever on both land and in the water. Flat-coats make exceptional family companions, bonding very closely with all members of the family. Compared with other sporting breeds, Flat-coats have a relatively low activity level indoors, but outdoors can play, run and retrieve tirelessly. Flat-coats given too little exercise, companionship and mental stimulation, however, can become overly active or destructive indoors, especially if left alone for extended periods of time. They are wonderful with older children but may be too exuberant for very small children. Early obedience training and socialisation are highly recommended. The well-socialised and well-trained Flat-coat is an optimistic, enthusiastic dog with a constantly wagging tail who is a friend to all.

Golden Retriever

The Golden Retriever is a breed of dog, historically developed as a gundog to retrieve shot waterfowl and upland game and lame hens during hunting. As such they were bred to have a soft mouth to retrieve game undamaged and an instinctive love of water. Their intelligence and versatility sees them employed in a variety of roles including illegal drug detection, search and rescue, as hunting dogs and as guide dogs.Their friendly, eager-to-please and patient demeanors have also made them popular family dogs.

Cocker Spaniel

The English Cocker Spaniel is a breed of gun dog. There are two varieties of English Cocker Spaniels, the "field" or "working" cocker and "show" cocker. It is one of several varieties of spaniel and somewhat resembles its American cousin, the American Cocker Spaniel, although it is closer to the working-dog form of the Field Spaniel and the Springer Spaniel. Outside the US, the breed is usually known simply as the Cocker Spaniel, as is the American Cocker Spaniel within the US. Due to the breed's happy disposition and continuously wagging tail, it has been given the cute nickname "merry cocker". They can be also dominant and loyal to their companion.

 

 

The American Cocker Spaniel is a medium size breed of dog. It is one of the Spaniel type breeds, similar to the English Cocker Spaniel, and was originally bred as a gun dog. In the United States, the breed is usually referred to as the Cocker Spaniel, while in Canada and elsewhere in the world, it is called the American Cocker Spaniel. The word cocker is commonly held to stem from their use to hunt woodcock in England. Although the Cocker Spaniel type originated in the United Kingdom, by the 1940s the American breed was recognized as distinct from the English breed.

Springer Spaniel

The English Springer Spaniel is a breed of gun dog traditionally used for flushing and retrieving game. It is one of many spaniel breeds. The English Springer Spaniel represents perhaps the greatest divergence between working and show lines of any breed of dog. A field-bred dog and a show-bred dog appear to be different breeds, but are registered together. 

Field-bred dogs tend to have shorter, coarser coats than the show-bred dogs. Their ears are less pendulous. Field-bred dogs are wiry and have more of a feral look than those bred for showing. The tail of the field bred dog is only docked by a few inches in comparison to the show dog to provide a "flag" for the hunter. Docking also prevents laceration of the tail during hunting. Field-bred dogs are generally selected for nose, hunting ability, and response to training rather than appearance.

Show dogs have longer fur and more pendant ears, dewlaps and dangling flews. The tail is docked to a short stub in those countries that permit docking. They are generally more thickly boned and heavier than field-bred springers.